Business & Job Creation

Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.

<p>Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.</p>

The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) hopes to deliver a revolution in the provision of energy: energy mandates from renewable resources.

Arizona Republic Editorial

For at least 43 years, personal adornment has been deemed constitutionally protected free speech. It goes back to when the U.S. Supreme Court concluded you could wear a black armband to school to protest the Vietnam War and the principal couldn't stop you.

By Gary Nelson, Arizona Republic

Does the government have the right to deny business permits because neighbors complain? Today the Arizona Supreme Court said no.

Ryan and Letitia Coleman followed all the rules the City of Mesa, Arizona set out to qualify for a business permit to open a high-end tattoo studio. But when neighbors complained, the city council denied the permit on a 6-1 vote. The only vote for the Colemans was Mesa Mayor Scott Smith who said there was not a shred of evidence that the business would harm the community.

After Hurricane Isaac blew through Louisiana, Gov. Bobby Jindal temporarily suspended licensing rules to allow EMTs to travel from other states and care for Louisianans. Similarly, after hurricanes ravaged Florida in 2004, then-Gov. Jeb Bush sought to ease licensing rules for roofers.

Byron Schlomach, economist at the Goldwater Institute in Phoenix, and David Wells, a political economy lecturer at Arizona State University, made their assessments on Mitt Romney's economic plan on KUAT-TV's Arizona Week. Byron reminds everyone that "it's not the president who creates jobs."

The Christian Science Monitor recently reported that more than half of all Americans receive significant income from the government. About one in five Americans holds a government job. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were nearly 300,000 state and local government employees in Arizona last year, or approximately ten percent of the Arizona labor force.

Scottsdale's Motor Mile just may be one of the most profitable corners of real estate in Arizona. Featuring luxury cars such as Bentley and Rolls-Royce, its a safe bet most Arizonans probably will spend more time dreaming about cars like these than driving them.

So why are taxpayers footing bills for these dealerships? A few years ago, the Scottsdale City Council voted to give $1.5 million to 19 car dealers for an ad campaign to make the area the ultimate car buying destination. I guess 19 car dealerships weren't obvious enough.

Arizona wine consumers soon may be calling up their favorite wineries to order vintages that are currently off-limits. The U.S. Supreme Court will rule in early spring whether to overturn Arizona's monopoly wine distribution system.

Prospective Arizona homebuyers face a double-whammy: escalating prices compounded by skyrocketing fees imposed by voracious local governments.

Chandler recently raised its development impact fees nearly 50 percent, adding nearly $6,000 to the price of a home. Avondale's fees nearly doubled with an $8,000 increase, bringing the total burden to a whopping $18,000 per home.

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