Campaign Finance & Election

Campaigns should be open and free, not prone to manipulation through government financing schemes. And now the U.S. Supreme Court agrees.

<p>Campaigns should be open and free, not prone to manipulation through government financing schemes. And now the U.S. Supreme Court agrees.</p>

Can restrictions on freedom of speech be lifted? Two cases just added to the U.S. Supreme Court docket may signal the start.

The outcome in either of the two cases could affect Arizona's Clean Elections Act. 

The first case, Randall v. Sorrell, concerns a Vermont law that set an extremely low limit on how much money citizens could contribute to candidates and limited the amount of money candidates could spend on their campaigns. 

Arizona judges are about to face increased voter scrutiny.

The Arizona Supreme Court has changed disclosure rules to give voters access to all complaints filed against Arizona judges, not just those that lead to formal sanctions. Formerly private reprimands for judicial indiscretions such as tardy rulings, DUI arrests, and accessing pornography on court computers will now be a matter of public record.

The Citizens Clean Elections Commission voted last week to remove Rep. David Burnell Smith from office. He is accused of violating state law by exceeding the spending limit set by the clean elections commission. Representative Smith reported himself to the commission and claims accounting errors are to blame for overspending.

Thomas Jefferson attacked the idea of forcing Americans to contribute to political causes they disagreed with. He called it "sinful and tyrannical." Most Americans still believe it violates a basic sense of fairness.

Three recently-elected state senators and representatives have violated Arizona campaign finance laws, according to preliminary findings from a Citizens Clean Elections Commission investigation. This announcement comes on the heels of the Commission announcing that it may remove Rep. David Burnell Smith from office for allegedly violating campaign finance laws as well. 

An Arizona Republic editorial this week was highly critical of legislative proposals concerning the method by which state appellate court judges and in Pima and Maricopa county judges are appointed and retained.  The editorial argues that no changes are necessary because the system "ain't broke."

The Goldwater Institute's Nick Dranias went on Liberty Watch with Charles Heller where he discussed the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals overturning the individual mandate in the health care law, as well as the latest on the Goldwater Institute's lawsuit of the federal health care law.

Listen to it here

Goldwater Institute attorney Nick Dranias squared off with Clean Elections executive director Todd Lang on KTVK's Politics Unplugged over the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that the matching funds provision of Arizona's Clean Elections law is unconstitutional.

Watch it here

Goldwater Institute attorney Nick Dranias appeared live on Jim Sharpe's show on KFYI to explain why the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on the matching funds provision of Arizona's Clean Elections law was the right one.

 

The Goldwater Institute's Clint Bolick joined KFYI's Mike Broomhead to explain to listeners what the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to strike down the matching funds provision of Arizona's Clean Elections law means for them.

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