City & Local Reform

It turns out that you can fight town hall. Here’s how we’re standing up for local citizens and winning.

<p>It turns out that you can fight town hall. Here’s how we’re standing up for local citizens and winning. </p>
Numerous states are shaking off decades-old union shackles that have dampened job growth, weighed down economies, and created fiscal crises. The rust-belt states of Michigan and Indiana are the latest to convert to right-to-work states, putting them on a better footing for economic growth. 
 

Introduction

 
Editor's Note: An earlier version of this report referred to Roy Vallee as Chairman and CEO of Avnet. In fact, Vallee resigned from his position at Avnet in 2011 and was replaced by Rick Hamada. The Goldwater Institute regrets the error. 
 
After secretly agreeing to hand $10 million of public money to Apple Inc., the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA) is coming under new scrutiny for sweetheart deals and bad investments. 
 

The City of Tucson recently enacted a discriminatory local bid preference ordinance, casting off the fundamental concepts of fairness, openness, and predictability in the public procurement process.  In doing so, the city raised costs for taxpayers in Tucson and throughout the state, guaranteeing Tucsonans will pay more for public services, while encouraging other cities to discriminate against Tucson businesses that seek to do work outside Old Pueblo.   

 
 
Contact: Lucy Caldwell
(602) 633-8986
 
 
 

 

Have you ever squeezed a balloon and had parts of it squeeze out between your fingers? Unless you pop the balloon with a pin, it will reemerge somewhere else when you squeeze it. Public employee pensions have become balloons, and abuse of public pension systems keeps oozing despite attempts to put the squeeze on it.

 

Contact: Lucy Caldwell

(602) 633-8986

 

MEDIA ADVISORY: RULING HALTS TAXPAYER-FUNDED UNION ACTIVISM

Goldwater Institute Lawsuit Puts Police Back on Patrol, Not at Union Desk.

 

Like most states across the country, Arizona has long suffered from abysmally low voter turnout in local elections. In the state’s two largest cities – Phoenix and Tucson – voter turnout rates for the most recent local candidate elections hovered at a mere 30 percent.

In a recent unanimous decision, the Arizona Court of Appeals held that school districts can't spend bond money on unapproved purposes when voters authorized that money for specific projects. This decision protects the state constitutionally-guaranteed rights of taxpayers and ensures that governments can't renege on their bond agreements with the voters.

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