Constitutional Rights

Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected.

<p>Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected. </p>

Our Vice President of Litigation Clint Bolick recently appeared on KKNT's newest radio program Arizona Politics & Culture with Seth Leibsohn and Tom Brown. Click here to learn about the Goldwater Institute's latest legal efforts to protect your constitutional rights.

  Josh Hoyt
  Josh Hoyt, former undergraduate president of ASU’s Polytechnic campus. When he criticized the Arizona Students Association, the organization quickly threatened him with a lawsuit.

The February 2006 edition of Arizona Attorney depicts a courthouse set ablaze in “Fair Courts Under Fire.” In it, Ted Schmidt of the law firm Kinerk, Beal, Schmidt, Dyer & Sethi, defends the virtues of Arizona’s merit-based selection system for judges but the article overlooks a significant flaw in the system. 

Merit-based judicial selection commissions are used in counties with a population of more than 250,000. In counties with a smaller population, citizens still vote for judges. 

Arizona Republic Editorial

For at least 43 years, personal adornment has been deemed constitutionally protected free speech. It goes back to when the U.S. Supreme Court concluded you could wear a black armband to school to protest the Vietnam War and the principal couldn't stop you.

Arizona wine consumers soon may be calling up their favorite wineries to order vintages that are currently off-limits. The U.S. Supreme Court will rule in early spring whether to overturn Arizona's monopoly wine distribution system.

In the movie "Sicko," Michael Moore takes Americans who have had problems getting medical care down to Cuba. In Cuba's collectivized system, Moore finds medical care for the sick and a model, according to him, for our country to emulate.

The problem is that medical care for Cubans is unlike that afforded to medical tourists. Conditions are so deplorable that diseases including leprosy, typhoid fever and tuberculosis, almost eradicated elsewhere, are becoming common in Cuba.

Constitutional rights are eternal. ­ But the City of Mesa believes that if you don't enforce them promptly, your right to do so expires. That would have been bad news for Oliver Brown, given that the Topeka, Kansas separate-but-equal laws had been on the books for decades before he challenged them.

In May, the Arizona Department of Education reported in the Arizona Daily Star that Arizona's student test scores were eight percent above the national average. That figure has since been revised to put Arizona's aggregate TerraNova scores at the 51.9 percentile, which is 3.8 percent above the national average.

Though it is well over two centuries old, the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms never has been definitively interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court-much less enforced.

The amendment's orphan status among the Bill of Rights may soon change because the Supreme Court has agreed to review a ruling by a federal appeals court striking down the District of Columbia's sweeping restrictions on handgun ownership.

The American Civil Liberties Union received an early holiday present this year, but as a result thousands of Arizona schoolchildren may find coal in their stockings.

That's because a bogus legal challenge to Arizona's individual scholarship tax credit program will be heard by a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit that includes Judge Stephen Reinhardt.

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