Constitutional Rights

Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected.

<p>Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected. </p>

With the passage of Proposition 207 in 2006, Arizona became the nation’s leader in the protection of private property rights. This year, the enactment of Senate Bill 1309 will make Arizona the leader in protecting the rights of parents as well.

As our nation’s capital continues to expand its power at an alarming rate, many conservatives (including me) are seeking shelter in the power of the states to protect the liberty of their citizens, on issues ranging from health insurance to the right of a secret ballot in deciding whether to form unions.

The nationwide call for state autonomy has grown so passionate that some are attempting to hijack it for wicked purposes.

What if you discovered a diabolical plot decades in the making to transform America into something sinister that could strip away your freedoms? Would you do all you could to reveal the plan and try to save the country, even if speaking out might destroy your life? That is the question facing the protagonist of Glenn Beck’s new novel The Overton Window.

In the summer of 2007, a group of college kids from the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University got together to talk about how to improve the work of  liberty-minded student groups. That discussion sparked the planning of a successful conference, which in turn built the foundation for a permanent organization to help college groups advocate for policies that support freedom.

Students For Liberty was born on February 24, 2008.

In its October 2010 issue, American Spectator asks, “Is It Time for a Convention?” The Goldwater Institute’s answer is a resounding “Yes!”

Even with a historic election upon us next week, realists have to recognize that Washington, D.C., won’t reform itself. No matter who controls Congress or the White House, politicians vote over and over again for runaway spending. To secure real reform, the states must trigger an amendments convention under Article V of the U.S. Constitution.

Want to make a difference in the fight for liberty? Consider law school. Here is my second set of tips for maximizing your chances for a law career that will position you to change the world:

Want to make a difference in the fight for liberty? Consider law school.

In no other arena can an individual have a greater impact for freedom. After all, the courts were intended to safeguard individual rights by holding the other two branches of government to their constitutional boundaries. And unlike politics, law tends to be black or white—you win or you lose—rather than shades of compromise. Look how dramatically cases like Brown v. Board of Education have changed the world.

Judges receive lots of criticism, which is deserved when they stray beyond their constitutional boundaries. But at the same time, the protection of our rights depends on principled and aggressive judicial action.

A recent decision by the Arizona Court of Appeals illustrates this important role, in the context of some of the most vulnerable members of society: Individuals unable to handle their own affairs who often become prey to unscrupulous guardians and lawyers.

Sometimes politicians don’t recognize a tsunami even when it hits them.
 
Voters in four states—Arizona, Utah, South Dakota, and South Carolina—voted in the last election to amend their constitutions to protect the right to secret ballots in union organizing elections.  The results were resounding, with approval rates ranging from 60 to 86 percent.
 

By Ralph Benko

Welcome to the Wild West, 2012 style.  The Feds to Tombstone:  “If you want to fix your water line, better lawyer up and talk to President Obama.”

Pages