Education Reform

Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career.

<p>Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career. </p>

A demographer recently displayed a map of the Southwestern United States at an academic conference and predicted it would become “the Appalachia of the 21st Century.”
 
Southwestern states, among others, have rapidly growing Hispanic populations which are transforming their K-12 demographic profiles into “majority-minority.” Hispanic students score lower on standardized tests, are more likely to drop out of school, and are much less likely to graduate from college.
 

Philosopher John Rawls argued that answers to societal problems should be decided as if we lived behind a "veil of ignorance." Behind the veil, no one would know what his or her position in life would be. You would not know whether you would grow up the child of a billionaire or poor in the inner-city. His theory was that this veil creates an incentive to create a path out of the latter, far less desirable, scenario.

On March 10, Pres. Barack Obama gave a major education speech before the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. In that speech, he declared that Secretary of Education Arne Duncan “will use only one test when deciding what ideas to support with your precious tax dollars: It’s not whether an idea is liberal or conservative, but whether it works.”

Phoenix--We hear it over and over: teaching is one of the most important professions in the country. So why is it hard to attract the top college graduates to the classroom? The answer is simple: schools treat teachers like factory workers rather than professionals.
 
"We simply cannot draw more people into teaching without addressing the elephant in the room," says Matthew Ladner, Ph.D., vice president of research at the Goldwater Institute. "Teaching, as currently practiced, is an unattractive career to many people because it does not reward merit."
 

Phoenix--Funding for Arizona public schools is a passionately debated subject. But the truth is, the state's complex accounting system makes it hard for policymakers to know exactly what is being spent on education. New figures released today take the guess work out of it and show that per-pupil funding in Arizona is more than $9,500.

Case background:

On June 22, 2007 the Goldwater Institute filed suit against the Arizona Department of Education on behalf of five charter schools. The Goldwater Institute's Scharf-Norton Center for Constititutional Litigation

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The Goldwater Institute's Vice President of Research, Dr. Matthew Ladner, appeared on Fox 10 Newsmaker Sunday to discuss the state of education in Arizona. Ladner talks about how much Arizona spends per student, where the money goes, All Day-K, and which state Arizona should model its education system after.

Watch it here.

The Goldwater Institute's Vice President of Research, Dr. Matthew Ladner, talked to ABC 15 News about the effects of budget cuts on education in Arizona.

Watch it here.

 

 

Phoenix--Arizona faces one of the largest budget deficits in the nation and lawmakers are struggling to close the gap. Because half of all General Fund spending goes toward education, schools and universities will necessarily be affected by the state's across-the-board belt tightening. 

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