Education Reform

Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career.

<p>Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career. </p>

Nearly a dozen education-related tax credit bills could revamp donations for schools, affecting campuses and tax returns across the state.

Arizonans can earn tax credits if they donate money for tuition at private schools or extracurricular activities at public schools. But the string of proposed laws could create an entirely new landscape.

If House Bill 2421 passes, the donations that now can be used only for extracurricular activities could be used for classroom instruction.

A father once wrote that formal schooling is futile when parents don't provide the right education during their children's earliest years.

That father was Aristotle and the work, dedicated to his son, the Nicomachean Ethics. Yet in its Monday editorial "Wanted: Teachers," The Republic makes this parent-teacher a mouthpiece for state planning.

Normally a balanced arbiter of news, the Tribune unfortunately has a blind spot for early education research, as seen most recently in Cece Todd's story "GOP plan eliminates funding for early childhood programs," (Jan. 29) and the editorial "Business sense: Expanding access to preschool would be good for Arizona's future" (Jan. 19).

New day care center features "educational toys, friendly, well-educated staff," and "a large, brightly-lit play area," but the room was "a bit crowded." Two stars.

A Zagat-style guide to childcare is just one of the possibilities proposed in "Growing Arizona," a new report released by the Arizona School Readiness Task Force. The report recommends that the state "establish a voluntary quality rating system, such as a one-, two-, or three-star rating, to give parents simple information they can use in choosing child care and preschool."

Guest Opinion

Given the chance, would you be willing to improve a student's life by forgoing one happy meal at McDonalds? Or by passing up one video rental from Blockbuster? If you answered yes, keep reading.

Five dollars is all it costs to make a child's dream come true under Arizona's revolutionary scholarship program.

Copyright © 2002 News World Communications, Inc. Reprinted with permission of The Washington Times.

"Preschool is a lot more important than high school. If I had my way, I would do away with the last grade in high school and put it on the front end."

So says Sen. Zell Miller, Georgia Democrat, in an hour-long PBS show "The Promise of Preschool," produced this year by veteran journalist John Merrow.

Critics of school choice have long questioned the ability of parents to choose the best schools for their children. Critics fear that parents do not have the time, qualifications, or information to make informed decisions about the quality of their children's schools. New evidence tells us it's time to put this fear to rest.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Advocates of limited government in Congress face a dilemma. For two decades, conservatives have sought to devolve federal power over education back to state and local governments. In 1981, Ronald Reagan entered office pledging to abolish the fledgling Department of Education. Since then hundreds of billions of federal taxpayer dollars have been spent in an effort to improve local educational services, but there has been no corresponding improvement in student performance on major national exams.

Phoenix-According to an AP report, Senate Appropriations Chairwoman Ruth Solomon (D-Tucson) has proposed suspending tax credits for donations to scholarship organizations along with tax credits for extracurricular activities, arguing the state could save $45 to $50 million. Goldwater Institute executive director Darcy Olsen disputes the wisdom-and the purported cost savings-of suspending the scholarship tax credit.

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

As the 2002 legislative session unfolds, lawmakers are grappling with what appear to be competing priorities: balancing the budget and improving education. Faced with an estimated $1.5 billion budget shortfall, legislators must rein in spending.1 Yet the need to reform Arizona's K-12 education system is also urgent. Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress show that one out of four Arizona eighth graders can't read and one out of three hasn't mastered basic math skills.2 This proposal offers legislators a way to improve educational opportunities for students while achieving fiscal savings.

Pages