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Property Rights

A Mesa, Arizona businessman learned about eminent domain abuse the hard way. When Bailey said he didn’t want to sell his family-owned brake shop, the city tried to use its power of eminent domain to take his property and give it to a local developer in the name of economic development. Bailey won in court, and Arizona passed Proposition 207 to help protect private property from such abuse. The Goldwater Institute developed Proposition 207 and is monitoring its success, and is committed to ensuring that government respects private property.

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  • Smoking ban violates business owner's property rights

    Posted on May 11, 2007 | Type: Op-Ed | Author: Mark Brnovich

    We have been inundated with stories about the statewide smoking ban that went into effect last week. Reports indicated that patrons cheered at some establishments when the ban became effective on May 1st.

  • Nothing to Cheer About

    Posted on May 08, 2007 | Type: Blog

    We have been inundated with stories about the statewide smoking ban that went into effect last week. Reports indicated that patrons cheered at some establishments when the ban became effective on May 1st. The Arizona Republic noted, The air in the Valley just got a little bit clearer, at least inside.

  • The Empire strikes back

    Posted on April 24, 2007 | Type: In the News

    Arizona voters sent a resounding message to their government: hands off our property. Passing Proposition 207 by a 65 percent majority, despite doomsday scenarios from elected officials and bureaucrats, the voters put the clamps on regulations that exceed normal governmental purposes and diminish the value of private property.

  • Property values shock taxpayers

    Posted on March 28, 2007 | Type: In the News

    As in years past, some disgruntled Cochise County taxpayers have been mystified this year by their increase in property value assessment, in light of the cooling real estate market. An anachronism of the valuation timetable causes this perceived problem, said Cochise County Assessor Philip Leiendecker. "It's a statewide statutory process and part of the problem here, really, is the valuation timetable placed by the legislature," the county assessor said. The 2008 valuation mailed out Feb. 28 is based on the market-value estimations from June 2005 to July 2006. "That period is when the big boom occurred," Leiendecker said. And those assessments will not be applied until next year's tax bills, he said.

  • Property owners asked to waive some rights

    Posted on February 16, 2007 | Type: In the News

    The League of Arizona Cities and Towns is encouraging its members to adopt waivers in which the person seeking a rezoning or conditional use permit agrees not to seek claims for the specific action requested.

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