Tax Reform

Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities.

<p>Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities. </p>

Tuesday's Wall Street Journal editorial page engaged in a bit of triumphalism. The editors showed that their 2003 predictions of where monetary policy was leading were better than those of Ben Bernanke. Bernanke's comments at a 2003 meeting of the Board of Governors make clear that lots of detailed knowledge can just as easily addle a brain as create clear thinking.

Whether proposed by Republicans or Democrats, tax increases cost jobs. And some taxes are even worse for employment than others. That's what a recent economic analysis of Arizona's proposed tax increases by the Beacon Hill Institute demonstrates.

A $1 billion sales tax increase would cost Arizona 14,400 private jobs. A $1 billion state income tax increase would cost even more jobs, about 26,000. 

No later than June 30, Arizona's legislature and Governor Brewer have to agree on a budget for fiscal 2010 or the state government will shut down.

Every year, people and their income move between states. They move for a number of reasons, but there’s ample evidence that cost of living and its relationship to tax burdens are a factor.

Since 2001, the federal tax code allowed business owners to write off more of the investment they make in their company each year and, today, businesses can write off 100 percent of the capital investments they made this year. But if Congress and the President don’t act, that tax cut will end in January 2012. State policymakers, on the other hand, could offer a little certainty in their state income tax code by allowing businesses to immediately write-off on their taxes the full value of their new capital investments.

On November 10, 2011, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker keynoted the Goldwater Institute Annual Dinner.

Goldwater Institute senior economist Stephen Slivinski went on 3TV to analyze GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain's 9-9-9 tax plan.

Watch it here

PHOENIX — In Arizona and across the country, small business owners and entrepreneurs spend billions of dollars and countless hours complying with regulations. But a new recommendation from the Goldwater Institute could offer these businesses help – and boost the jobs outlook along the way.

Excessive regulation is needlessly destructive to the economy and job creation – and the Goldwater Institute’s annual Legislative Report Card shows that elected officials in both parties fail to recognize the problem.

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