Workplace Freedom

When it comes to unionizing, workers should be free of intimidation. The Goldwater Institute’s Save Our Secret Ballot effort is ensuring workers have anonymous ballots in union votes.

<p>When it comes to unionizing, workers should be free of intimidation. The Goldwater Institute’s Save Our Secret Ballot effort is ensuring workers have anonymous ballots in union votes.</p>

A union push for federal “card check” legislation could make things more difficult for small businesses and open workers up to intimidation. The Goldwater Institute stands by workers’ rights to an anonymous ballot in union votes, and drafted the Save Our Secret Ballot amendment, already law in four states. While the Obama administration is fighting us in court, we will continue to stand by small businesses and their employees who deserve the right to vote in private.

Santa Claus will keep his appointment with millions of Arizona children this Christmas after narrowly dodging a bureaucratic barrage.

The opening salvo came from the Department of Employment Services, which cited Santa for failing to pay a minimum wage - or any wage - to his helpers. "Working for 'the joy of it,' " the citation alleged, "is unlawful in Arizona."

How many times in a restaurant have you pondered your menu choices, wondering whether the bacon cheeseburger or the garden salad would be more heart healthy? Can't decide? Help from the government may be on the way.?

State Sen. Amanda Aguirre, D-Yuma, thinks that its state governments job to help us make better eating choices. She has introduced SB1436 which would require menus at chain restaurants to list levels of calories, trans fats and sodium for all items.

Scottsdale Fire Vote May 20

DAVID DODENHOFF SPECIAL TO THE TRIBUNE -- David Dodenhoff, an adjunct fellow with the Hudson Institute, is the author of a new Goldwater Institute study, "A Test of Fire: Rural/Metro and the Future of Fire Services in Scottsdale."

During the days of the long-distance telephone wars, it seemed that almost every night a sales rep would call and try to convince me to switch carriers. I would explain that I'd been with my carrier a long time, the service was excellent, and the price was right. Why would I want to switch?

Executive Summary

In Arizona, occupational licensing requirements and regulations stifle competition, diminish quality of service, and drive up prices. Thousands of laws restrict entry into occupations for persons wishing to serve consumers as cosmetologists, barbers, African hairbraiders, taxicab drivers and street vendors. State agencies and occupational licensing boards act as gatekeepers, restricting competition and ensnaring entrepreneurs in thick layers of red tape.

John Talley and Orlantha Whitehair have known for years that they wanted to be doctors.

They want to spend their lives helping others. They especially want to help the disadvantaged. They are enthralled by all the discovery going on in medical science and the promise it holds for earlier diagnosis and treatment of disease.

They know about the negatives: long hours, interference from health care bureaucracies, the debt of up to $100,000 that they will have to pay back after they finish training.

The Obama Administration has fired its opening salvo against a cornerstone of democracy: the right to secret ballot.

Last fall, voters in four states voted overwhelmingly to amend their constitutions protect the right of workers to vote by secret ballot in deciding whether or not to form unions. That right has been enshrined in federal law for 75 years but is threatened by bills pending in Congress.

The Obama administration has fired its opening salvo against a cornerstone of democracy: the right to secret ballot.

Last fall, voters in four states voted overwhelmingly to amend their constitutions to protect the right of workers to vote by secret ballot in deciding whether or not to form unions. That right has been enshrined in federal law for 75 years but is threatened by bills pending in Congress.

By now its clear that racial and ethnic preferences, disguised as affirmative action, do little to solve the underlying causes of the achievement gap that limits opportunities for blacks and Hispanics. So it is welcome news that Ward Connerly, who heads the American Civil Rights Institute, came to Phoenix today to announce Super Tuesday initiatives to end racial preferences in multiple states, including Arizona.

Pinal County is prosecuting restaurant owner Dale Bell for letting his customers dance under the stars. After the longest zoning hearing in the County's history, the hearing officer found Dale liable for running an illegal dance hall because he allows or permits dancing outside of a completely enclosed structure at his steakhouse, San Tan Flat.

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